Thomas Hepburn Buckler

Birth: 1812, Jan. 4
Death: 1901, Jan. 20
Occupation: doctor

Associated Counties

  • Baltimore
  • Baltimore City

US Census

Year Occupation County Ward/District Post Office Page
1850 physician Baltimore City 10 109

Directories

Date Name Occupation Address City
1840-1841 Buckler doctor St. Paul Street N of Lexington W side Baltimore City
1842 Thomas Buckler M.D. St. Paul St n of Mulberry Baltimore City
1865-1866 Thomas H. Buckler doctor 41 Lexington Baltimore City
1843 Thomas Buckler doctor 40 St. Paul st. Baltimore City
1863-1864 Thomas Buckler doctor 41 W Lexington Baltimore City
1851 Thomas H. Buckler doctor 41 Lexington Baltimore City
1859 Thomas H. Buckler doctor 41 Lexington Baltimore City
1856-1857 Thomas H. Buckler physician 41 Lexington Baltimore City
1853-1854 Thomas Buckler doctor 41 Lexington St. Baltimore City

Additional Information

  • Dates: 1812-?
    Notes:
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 70-71
  • Dates: 1812-1901
    Notes:

    Name: Thomas Hepburn Buckler
    Death date: Apr 20, 1901
    Place of death: Baltimore, MD
    Birth date: 1812
    Type of practice: Allopath
    Places and dates of practices:Baltimore, MD
    Medical school(s): University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore: University of Maryland School of Medicine and Coll of Phys and Surgeons, 1835, (G)
    Journal of the American Medical Association Citation: 36:1267

    Source: Directory of Deceased American Physicians 1804-1929

  • Dates: 1812-1901
    Notes: BUCKLER, Thomas Hepburn (1812-1901), Baltimore teacher and writer, was born at Evergreen, Maryland, on January 4, 1812, and was educated at St. Mary’s College, Baltimore, taking his M.D. in 1835 with a thesis on “Animal Heat.” He practiced afterwards in that city as physician to the City Almshouse, and from 1866 to 1890 he became a Paris physician under a license from the French government; then he returned to Baltimore.

    He was best known as a teacher and writer. His views were independent and original — some said original even to eccentricity. Quinan, in his “Medical Annals of Baltimore” gives a list of thirty-two of his writings, a great many of them on sanitary and social subjects, among other things, the filling up the “Basin” or inner harbor of Baltimore, with “Federal Hill,” and the introduction of the waters of the Gunpowder River for the supply of Baltimore. The latter of these recommendations was carried out many years later. He introduced phosphate of ammonia for the treatment of gout and rheumatism, and as a solvent of uric acid calculi, and the lithic acid diathesis generally; also the hydrated succinate of the peroxide of iron for the prevention of gallstones. He laid great stress in the pathology of the vessels in the cervix and the resulting malnutrition of the organ. More elaborate works are his history of the “Cholera Epidemic of 1849” and a treatise on “Fibro-bronchitis and Rheumatic Pneumonia,” 1853.

    Dr. Buckler was a man of striking personal appearance and was much sought after on account of his brilliant conversational powers and wit. He never had a large practice; in fact never sought one, and lacked the steadiness and plodding perseverance of his brother. He was twice married and left a son, William H. There are two portraits of Dr. Buckler in the building of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, Baltimore.

    Eugene F. Cordell
    Source: Kelly, Howard A. and Burrage, Walter J., Dictionary of American Medical Biography: Lives of Eminent Physicians of the United States and Canada, From the Earliest Times [reprint of 1928 edition] Boston: Milford House: 166-167

  • Dates: 1812-1901
    Notes: Born at “Evergreen,” near Baltimore, January 4, 1812. Educated at St. Mary’s College, Baltimore; M.D., University of Maryland, 1835; began practice at Baltimore; Physician to Baltimore City Almshouse for eight years, 1840-44 and 1846-50 (Q.); from 1866-90 practiced at Paris under license from the French Government; returned to Baltimore in 1890; in 1878, Commissioner of Maryland to International Exposition at Paris; he was the author of “Introduction of Water of Gunpowder River into Baltimore,” 1847; “History of Epidemic of Cholera at Baltimore Almshouse,” 1851; “Proposal to fill up the Basin,” 1852, and later; “Bronchitis and Rheumatic Pneumonia,” 1853. Died at Baltimore, April 20, 1901.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 338
  • Dates: 1835
    Notes: M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Historical Sketch of the University of Maryland School of Medicine (1807-1890), with an Introductory Chapter, Notices of the Schools of Law, Arts and Sciences, and Theology, and the Department of Dentistry, and a General Catalog of Medical Alumni Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 166
  • Dates: 1840-4, 1846-50
    Notes: Served as Attending Physician, Baltimore City and County Alms House, 1840-4, 1846-50
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 250
  • Dates: 1849
    Notes: Cholera at Almshouse; 669 inmates, 155 cases, 86 deaths, but as soon as its source, a foul sewer, was discovered and removed, the disease ceased. Thos. H. Buckler and H. W. Baxley, physicians.
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 39
  • Dates: 1851/03/13
    Notes: Dr. Thos. H. Buckler publishes not only a clear narrative of the facts connected with the visitation of cholera at the Almshouse, but makes an able showing of what science, guided by common sense, can do to suppress the disease. His book is one of the most eloquent sermons on sanitation extant.
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 39
  • Dates: 1853/05/19
    Notes: Baltimore Pathological Society organized by Drs. D. Steuart, Pottenger, Frick (Ch.), Murdock (Thos. F.), Turner, Donaldson (F.), Johnstone (Ch.), Buckler (T. H.), and Van Bibber (W.C.).
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 40
  • Dates: 1901
    Notes: Died, Baltimore City, Apr. 20, 1901, age 89
    Source: Arps, Walter E., Jr., Maryland Mortalities 1876-1915 from the (Baltimore) Sun Almanac Westminster: Family Line Publications: 35
  • Dates: 1901/01/20
    Notes: Tombstone
    Source: Gravestone found on personal visit, December, 2005. St. Thomas Church, Garrison, Baltimore County, MD.

Bibliography

  • Buckler, Thomas Heburn, A history of epidemic cholera as it appeared at the Baltimore city and county alms-house in the summer of 1849 with some remarks on the medical topography and diseases of this region Baltimore: Printed by J. Lucas.