John Beale Davidge

Birth: 1768
Death: 1829, Aug. 23
Occupation: doctor

Associated Counties

  • Baltimore City

Directories

Date Name Occupation Address City
1816 John B. Davidge doctor New Church near Charles Street Baltimore City
1817-1818 John B. Davidge doctor; professor of anatomy in the University of Maryland dwelling: Church near Charles Baltimore City
1819 John B. Davidge doctor Church near Charles Baltimore City
1807 Davidge doctor corner of East Street St. Paul’s Lane Baltimore City
1814-1815 John B. Davidge doctor New Church, near Charles Street Baltimore City
1799 John B. Davidge doctor 41 Charles Street Baltimore City
1812 John B. Davidge M.D. New Church near Charles St. Baltimore City
1808 Davidge doctor corner of East Street & St. Paul’s Lane Baltimore City
1803 John Beale Davidge M.D. East Street Baltimore City
1810 John B. Davidge doctor Chatham Street near St. Paul’s Lane Baltimore City
1804 John Davidge M.D. East Street Baltimore City
1822-1823 John B. Davidge M.D. Conewago north side west of Charles Baltimore City
1824 John B. Davidge M.D. Conewago north side west of Charles Baltimore City

Additional Information

  • Dates: 1768
    Notes:

    John Beale DAVIDGE
    Sex:  M
    
    Event(s):
    Birth:  1768  Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland
    
    Parents:
    Father:  Henry DAVIDGE
    Mother:  Honor HOWARD  

    Source: FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v4.02
    Source:

  • Dates: 1768-1829
    Notes: Born at Annapolis, Md., 1768. A.M., (St. Johns’ College ?), 1789; pupil of Drs. James and William Murray, Annapolis; then attended lectures at Philadelphia and at Edinburgh, but took M.D. at the University of Glasgow, 1793; practiced first at Birmingham, England; then returned to Maryland and settled at Baltimore, 1796; Attending Physician, Baltimore General Dispensary, 1801; began medical teaching in 1802; Founder of the College of Medicine (University of Maryland), 1807; Professor of Anatomy or Surgery, College of Medicine of Maryland, 1807-29; Dean, College of Medicine of Maryland, 1807-11, 1813, 1814, 1821; Orator, Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, 1805; he was the author of ‘Nosologia Methodica’ (in Latin), two editions, 1812 and 1813; ‘Physical Sketches,’ two vols., 1814 and 1816; ‘Treatis on Yellow Fever,’ 1798; ‘Treatise on Amputation.” 1818; edited ‘Bancroft on Fevers,’ 1821, and a quarterly journalm entitled Baltimore Philosophical Journal and Review, 1823, of which only one number appeared. His important operations were, a total extirpation of the parotid gland, 1823; ligation of the gluteal artery for aneurism; ligature of the carotid artery for ‘fungus of the antrum.’ He invented the ‘American method of amputation.’ His death was due to carcinoma of the face. ‘Of pleasing address, very remarkable colloquial powers and high professional character.’ Died at Baltimore, August 23, 1829.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 371
  • Dates: 1768-1829
    Notes: This surgeon, founder of the University of Maryland, was born in Annapolis in 1768, his father, an ex-captain in the British Army, his mother Honor Howard of Anne Arundel County. At an early age he was deprived of his father, and his mother wanted to apprentice him to a cabinet-maker. But, resolved to have an education and obtaining aid from friends and coming into possession of some slaves through the death of a relative, he entered St. John’s College and there took his A.M. in 1789, beginning to study medicine with Drs. James and William Murray, of Annapolis, and spent several years in Edinburgh, where he devoted himself especially to the study of anatomy. His voyage to Scotland was made in a sailing vessel, and among his shipmates were Drs. Hosack, Brockenbrough and Troup; and they, encountering very rough weather, were compelled to work hard at the pumps to keep the vessel from sinking. From motives of economy, like many students of the time, he took his degree (April 22, 1793) at Glasgow rather than Edinburgh. About this time he married Wilhelmina Stuart of the Firth of Solway, a lady several years his senior. After practising for a short time in Birmingham, England, he returned to Maryland, and finally selected Baltimore as his permanent home. In 1797 a severe epidemic of yellow fever raged in the city and there was a public discussion of the disease by the physicians in the newspapers. Davidge bore a prominent part, and early in the following year republished his views in a volume which was freely quoted in later works upon the subject.

    He was one of the first attending physicians to the Baltimore General Dispensary on its foundation in 1801. In 1802 we first note his advertisement of private courses of medical lectures, and these courses were continued annually until 1807, when, being joined by Drs. James Cocke and John Shaw his school was chartered as the College of Medicine of Maryland. In 1813 a charter for a University was obtained, and this institution became the department of medicine, Dr. Davidge holding the chair of anatomy and surgery from 1807 to his death, and for a number of years he was also dean.

    In person, Prof. Davidge is represented as being short and stout, with blue eyes, florid complexion and homely, rugged features, small hands and feet and a graceful carriage. He walked with a slight limp after 1818, in consequence of a fracture of the thigh bone. His lectures were described by Prof. Lunsford P. Yandell as being “models of simple elegance,” but “he seemed to forget the English idiom the moment he took pen in hand.” His style of writing was stiff, affected and obscure, and marked by obsolete modes of spelling and expression. He had very positive views on medical subjects and believed menstruation to be a secretion of the uterus excited by ovarian irritation. He opposed the support of the perineum on the ground that nature is sufficient for her own processes. He also declared himself against the speculum vaginae because it smacked of immoral curiosity.

    His first wife dying, Dr. Davidge married Mrs. Rebecca Troup Polk, widow of Josiah Polk, of Harford County, Maryland, who survived him with four of his children, a son by his first wife and three daughters by his second.

    He died at his house in Lexington street on August 23, 1829, of malignant disease of the antrum of Highmore.

    His most important writings were: “Treatise on Yellow Fever,” 1798; “Nosolgia Methodica” in Latin, two editions, 1812 and 1813; “Physical Sketches,” two volumes, 1814 and 1816; “Treatise on Amputation,” 1818. He edited “Bancroft on Fevers,” 1821, and a quarterly journal entitled, Baltimore Philosophical Journal and Review, 1823, of which only one number appeared. His important operations were amputation at shoulder-joint soon after 1792 (Reese); ligation of the gluteal artery for aneurysm; ligation of the carotid artery for fungus of the antrum; total extirpation of the parotid gland, 1823. He invented a new method of amputation which he called the “American.”

    Eugene P. Cordell
    Historical Sketch of the University of Maryland, Cordell, 1891.
    Medical Annals of Maryland, Cordell, 1903. Portrait.
    His great-great-grandson, Walter D. Davidge, an attorney of Washington City, has an oil painting of him.

    Source: Kelly, Howard A. and Burrage, Walter J., American Medical Biographies Baltimore: Norman, Remington Company: 287-288

  • Dates: 1769-1829
    Notes:
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 89-90
  • Dates: 1796
    Notes: “Dr. John Beale Davidge settled to practice in Baltimore.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 19
  • Dates: 1796
    Notes: Drs. John Beale Davidge, Nathaniel Potter and John Crawford begin practice in Baltimore.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 668
  • Dates: 1797, Aug. 20
    Notes: “Drs. Falls, Davidge, and Goodwin visit Fell’s Point, and report the existence of Bilious Remittent Fever.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 20
  • Dates: 1797/08/29
    Notes: Drs. Falls, Davidge and Goodwin report existence of bilious remittent fever at Fells Point (August 29).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 669
  • Dates: 1798
    Notes: Davidge’s work on yellow fever published.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 671
  • Dates: 1798-1808
    Notes: 1798, p. 36; 1799-1800, p. 370; Assessment Book 1800, p. 231; 1801-1803, p. 95; 1804-1808, p. 113
    Source: Baltimore City Archives. A Name Index to the Baltimore City Tax Records, 1798-1808. Baltimore: Baltimore City Archives, 1981. See Ancestry.Com
  • Dates: 1801-1802
    Notes: Attending Physician, Baltimore General Dispensary
    Source: Baxley, C. Herbert, ed., A History of the Baltimore General Dispensary Baltimore: Baltimore General Dispensary Foundation, Inc.: 109
  • Dates: 1801-2
    Notes: Served as Attending Physician, Baltimore General Dispensary, 1801-2
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 251
  • Dates: 1802, Dec. 7
    Notes: “Dr. John B. Davidge lecures on Midwifery, at his residence on East (now Fayette) street, a little above Presbyterian Church; after finishing this course will begin one on Surgery.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1802/12/07
    Notes: Dr. John B. Davidge begins lectures on Anatomy, Surgery, Midwifery, and Physiology (December 7); these lectures were continued annually until merged in the College of Medicine of Maryland in 1807.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 674
  • Dates: 1803, Jun. 3
    Notes: “Medical and Chirurgical Faculty meet. Nat. Potter, Secretary; H. Wilkins, Treasurer; Censors Western Shore, Drs. Coulter, Crawford, Alexander, Archer, Sen., Geo. Brown, Chas. A. Warfield and James Stewart. Drs. Brown, Davidge et al. are appointed a committee to digest a plan for a Medical College.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1804
    Notes: Medical Society of Baltimore founded, with Dr. Dunkel as President, and Dr. Davidge as Secretary.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 675
  • Dates: 1804
    Notes: “Dr. J. B. Davidge lectures on Midwifery.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1804
    Notes: “Medical Society of Baltimore, President, Dr. Dunkel; Vice-President, Jno. Crawford; J.B. Davidge, Secretary; Drs. Smyth, Mackenzie (C.), Potter, Chatard (P.), Alexander, members.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1805
    Notes: “Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland meet. They endorse vaccination; orations are delivered by Drs. Davidge and Crawford. The Faculty offer to grant licenses to Oculists if foiund competent (Federal Gazette, March 18, 1806).
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1805/06
    Notes: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty meets at Baltimore; Drs. Crawford and Davidge deliver orations; vaccination again endorsed; licenses to be granted to oculists when competent.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 675
  • Dates: 1806
    Notes: “Dr. J.B. Davidge still lectures on Midwifery at his residence (East street), and Dr. James Cocke, his partner in practice, lectures at the same place on Materia Medica and Physiology to a class of four.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24
  • Dates: 1807
    Notes: “Dr. John Shaw, of Annapolis, settles to practice in Baltimore, and is elected physician to Baltimore General Dispensary. Dr. Jno. Shaw joins Davidge and Cocke, and lectures on Chemistry to a class of seven(?)”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 24-25
  • Dates: 1807, Dec. 18
    Notes: “The College of Medicine, of Maryland, incorporated. Drs. Davidge, Shaw, Cocke, Brown (Geo.), Wm. Donaldson and Thos. E. Bond, in charter as professors of the new college, but the last three in decline, and Dr. Nat. Potter is elected to chair of Practice, vice Dr. Brown. Dr. Davidge erects an Anatomical Hall, southeast corner Liberty and Saratoga streets, as a lecture and dissecting room, but it is torn down and his anatomical preparations destroyed by a mob (Griffiths’ Annals; Potter’s History of the College).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 25
  • Dates: 1807/11
    Notes: Dr. Davidge’s Anatomical Hall, southeast corner of Liberty and Saratoga Streets, demolished by mob. The physicians rally to Davidge’s support and determine to apply to the Legislature for a charter for a medical college (November).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 676
  • Dates: 1807-11, 1813, 1814, 1821
    Notes: Dean, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Historical Sketch of the University of Maryland School of Medicine (1807-1890), with an Introductory Chapter, Notices of the Schools of Law, Arts and Sciences, and Theology, and the Department of Dentistry, and a General Catalog of Medical Alumni Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 209
  • Dates: 1807-29
    Notes: Professor, University of Maryland School of Medicine
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Historical Sketch of the University of Maryland School of Medicine (1807-1890), with an Introductory Chapter, Notices of the Schools of Law, Arts and Sciences, and Theology, and the Department of Dentistry, and a General Catalog of Medical Alumni Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 210
  • Dates: 1812/10/17
    Notes: Letter of James Cocke, John B. Davidge, and William Gibson relating to the College of Medicine, “to prepare a statement with regard to the condition and prospects of this institution, to the progress of the building for the accommodation of the class, to the courses of lectures to be delivered here next winter, &c.”
    Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1812/10/17
  • Dates: 1813/10/02
    Notes: Report of the committee of faculty of physick of the University of Maryland appointed to “examine into and report the present state of the Institution.”
    Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1813/10/02
  • Dates: 1815/02/15
    Notes: CHAP. CXXVIII. An Act for the aid of the Library Company of Baltimore. Lib. TH. No. 4, fol. 383
    Source:
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: Dr. Skipwith Coale invents apparatus for fracture of clavicle, which is highly commended by Drs. Gibson and Davidge.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 682
  • Dates: 1816, Dec. 16
    Notes: “Dr. Skipwith Coale invents an apparatus for oblique fracture of clavicle, highly commended by Gibson and Davidge.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 28
  • Dates: 1817, Jan. 16
    Notes: “Legislature grant Lottery Scheme of $100,000 to Drs. Davidge, Potter, Baker, Gibson, McDowell and DeButts, and others, for the benefit of the Medical University.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 28
  • Dates: 1817/01/16
    Notes: Legislature grants lottery scheme of $100,000 to Drs. Davidge, Potter, Baker, Gibson, McDowell and DeButts for benefit of the University (January 16).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 683
  • Dates: 1818
    Notes: Description of the Medical College of Maryland.
    Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1818
  • Dates: 1819/08/26
    Notes:

    John Beale DAVIDGE
    Sex:  M
    
    Marriage(s):
    Spouse:  Rebecca POLK
    Marriage:  26 Aug 1819   Baltimore, Maryland
    

    Source: FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index
    Source:

  • Dates: 1823
    Notes: Drs. Davidge and R. W. Hall each tie the carotid for fungous growth in the antrum.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy,
    Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 688
  • Dates: 1823
    Notes: Dr. Davidge removes the entire parotid.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 688
  • Dates: 1823/10
    Notes: “Dr. Davidge ties the carotid for fungous growth in the Antrum (Pattison’s Surg. Anat., p. 481). Dr. R.W. Hall does the same operation. Dr. Wm. D. McGill ties both carotids in same subject, at an interval of a month, for Fungous Tumor of the Eyes, with relief to patient. The first operation of the kind in America. (See Trans. Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, 1835, p. 5; also American Journal Medical Science, 1847, July, p. 37, and N.Y. Medical and Physical Journal, vol. iv. p. 576). Dr. Davidge removes the entire Parotid (Cooper’s Surg. Dict., in verbo).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 32
  • Dates: 1826/03/08
    Notes: “Board of Trustees of Maryland Unversity (Medical Department) meet and organize, and reappoint Drs. Davidge, Potter, DeButts, Hall, Baker, and McDowell, who accept their positions, and they also Dr. John Buckler as Adjunct Professor of Anatomy.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 33
  • Dates: 1829
    Notes: “Dr. John Beale Davidge (Pater Collegii Medici Terra Mariae) ob. aet. 60.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 34
  • Dates: 1829
    Notes: Deaths: Drs. Jos. A. Beall, of Prince George County; J. B. Taylor; Edward Johnson, at Baltimore, April 19, aet. 62; Elijah Davis, in Harford County, June 29, aet. 68; J. B. Davidge, at Baltimore, August 23, aet. 61.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 691
  • Dates: 1829/09/03
    Notes: “Resolutions of condolence on the death of Dr. Davidge, by the Faculty and Students of the Medical University (Federal Gazette).
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 34
  • Dates: 1872/01/15
    Notes:

    OBITUARY.

    Monday night, the 15th inst., at the residence of her son, Dr. John Polk, Abingdon, Harford County, Md., Mrs. REBECCA DAVIDGE departed this life, 87 years of age.

    Mrs. Davidge, nee Troup, was born in Queen Anne County, Eastern shore of Maryland, and was married to Josiah Polk, son of Judge William Polk, of Somerset County, Maryland; her descendants in this City from this marriage are Mrs. D. D. Field and Mrs. Eugene Pomeroy. Some years after the death of Mr. Polk she married Dr. John Beale Davidge, of Baltimore, Professor of Anatomy, and one of the most eminent physicians of his day. Mrs. Davidge was remarkable for great simplicity and dignity of presence. She was charity itself; no harsh or unjust sentiment could find place in her breast; she was graceful, sincere; she was kind and true. She enjoyed the consideration which such characters naturally inspire; her friends were numerous and devoted. Full of years and of Christian virtues, she has passed into that sleep from which the awakening is into everlasting life. Such reflections cannot fail to soothe the sense of beareavement.

    SOURCE: New York Times Jan. 18, 1872
    Source:

  • Dates: var. dates.
    Notes: Davidge, John Beale 1768-1829

    See: American National Biography. 24 volumes. Edited by John A. Garraty and Mark C. Carnes. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. (AmNatBi)
    See: Biographical Index to American Science. The seventeenth century to 1920. Compiled by Clark A. Elliott. Bibliographies and Indexes in American History, no. 16. New York: Greenwood Press, 1990. (BiInAmS)
    See: Dictionary of American Biography. Volumes 1-20. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1928-1936. (DcAmB)
    See: Dictionary of American Medical Biography. Lives of eminent physicians of the United States and Canada, from the earliest times. By Howard A. Kelly and Walter L. Burrage. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1928. Reprint. Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands: Longwood Press, 1979. (DcAmMeB)
    Dictionary of American Medical Biography. Two volumes. Edited by Martin Kaufman, Stuart Galishoff, and Todd L. Savitt. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1984. (DcAmMeB 84)
    See: A Dictionary of North American Authors Deceased before 1950. Compiled by W. Stewart Wallace. Toronto: Ryerson Press, 1951. Reprint. Detroit: Gale Research, 1968. (DcNAA)
    See: The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. Volume 22. New York: James T. White & Co., 1932. Reprint. Volumes 1-50. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms, 1967-1971. Use the Index to locate biographies. (NatCAB 22)
    See: Who Was Who in America. A component volume of “Who’s Who in American History.” Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Revised Edition. Chicago: Marquis Who’s Who, 1967. (WhAm HS)

    Source: Biography and Genealogy Master Index (BGMI). See Ancestry.com
    Source:

Bibliography

  • Bancroft, Edward Nathaniel, An essay on the disease called yellow fever; with observations concerning febril contagion, typhus fever, dysentery, and the plague, partly delivered as the Gulstonain lectures, before the College of Physicians, in the years 1806 and 1807. By Edward Nathaniel Bancroft… And republished, with notes, by John B. Davidge… Baltimore: Cushing and Jewett. 526 p. plan. 23 cm.
    Originally published in London in 1811.
    Includes material omitted from the lectures when delivered, additional facts, three new chapters on typhus, dysentery, and the plague, and eight appendices “to confirm or illustrate particular positions contained in the Essay.” (Cf. Author’s Advertisement, p. xxi)
    “A few brief notes, by John Davidge”: p. [503]-519.
  • Davidge, John Beale, A treatise on the autumnal endemial epidemick of tropical climates vulgarly called the yellow fever; containing its origin, history, nature, and cure; together with a few reflections on the proximate cause of diseases. Baltimore: W. Warner.
  • Davidge, John Beale, A treatise on the autumnal endemial epidemick of tropical climates vulgarly called the yellow fever; containing its origin, history, nature, and cure; together with a few reflections on the proximate cause of diseases. Baltimore: Printed by W. Pechin, No. 15, Baltimore-street. 65, [1] p. 19 cm. Evans 33603
    Appendix (p. [59]-65) added after the treatise was at the press, contains the letter addressed to Governor Thomas Mifflin of Pennsylvania by the physicians of Philadelphia in reply to his request of Nov. 6, 1797 for information on yellow fever. Signed by Benjamin Rush and twelve others, it was also published in 1798 by the Academy of Medicine of Philadelphia under title: Proofs of the origin of the yellow fever, in Philadelphia & Kensington, in the year 1797.
    “Errata”: p. [66]
  • Davidge, John Beale, A tract on amputation. [In his: Physical Sketches[ Baltimore: J. Robinson.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Remarks on the precedent essay [on yellow-fever, by J.B.R.P. Desportes] and causes. By Paeon [pseud.] [In his: Physical Sketches] Baltimore: J. Robinson.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Physical sketches, or Outlines of correctives, applied to certain modern errours in physick Baltimore: Printed by W. Warner. 3 v. plates. 22 cm.
    Vol. 3 lacks alternate title.
    Vols. 2-3 printed by J. Robinson
    Largely previously published works by Davidge and correspondence, with some selections from other authors.
    “Dissertatio physiologica de causis catameniorum” (the author’s thesis, Glasgow, 1793); v. [1] p. [7]-30, with special title page dated 1793; followed by an English translation (p. [3]-56)
    “A treatis on the autumnal endemial epidemick… commonly called the yellow fever”: v. [1], p. [57]-136, with special title page dated 1813; apparently reprinted, with slight differences, from the Baltimore edition of 1798.
    Vol. 3 includes “A memoir on the fracture of the thigh-bone” (p. [95]-128) and “Extirpation of the parotid gland” (p. [165]-183).
  • Davidge, John Beale, An oration, delivered before, and published by the request of the Medical Faculty of Maryland, at their last biennial congress in the city of Baltimore on the 6th day of June, 1805… Baltimore: John West Butler. 30 p. 21 cm.
    Treatis of the qualifications and duties of a physician.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Nosologia methodica: series classium, et generum, et specierum, et varietatum morborum exhibens. Baltimoriensi: S. Hall. Differs slightly from the edition published in 1812. The introduction, refuting Benjamin Rush’s theories of pathology and nosology, have been expanded. Minor changes have been made in the text.
    “Corrigenda” on slip mounted on p. [1] following introduction.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Nosologia methodica: series classium, et generum, et specierum, et varietatum morborum exhibens. Baltimoriensi: Benjamin Edes. vi, ssiii, [3] 10-99p. 23 cm.
    Preface and introduction in English; text in Latin and English on opposite pages.
    A syllabus prepared chiefly for the use of the students of the College of Medicine of Maryland.
    The author’s introduction refutes Benjamin Rush’s theories of pathology and nosology.
    “Corrigenda”; [1] p. at the end of introduction.
  • Davidge, John Beale, An examination of the question: Is the human constitution susceptible of the action of the smallpox a second time? By Celsus [pseud.] [In his: Physical Sketches] Baltimore: Robinson.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Dissertatio Physiologica, de causis catamemiorum…. [Reprint. To which is now aded a translation into English. In his: Physicial Sketches] Baltimore: W. Warner.
  • Davidge, John Beale, Dissertatio Physiologica, de causis catamemiorum…. [Cited as the author’s thesis, University of Glasgow, by J.R. Quinan, Medical Annals of Baltimore, 1884, pp. 90. Birminghamiae [Eng.]: T. Pearson.