Washington University School of Medicine of Baltimore

Founded: Opened 1827, closed 1851; reopened 1867
Closed: Closed temporarily 1851-1866; closed permanently 1877
Location ?-?: NE corner Lombard and Hanover Streets (New Assembly Rooms), Baltimore, MD
Location 1827-1838: North Holliday Street, between Lexington and Saratoga Sts. , Baltimore, MD
Location 1838-1849: SE corner Market and Hampstead Hill, Baltimore, MD
Location 1867-1868, 1870-1871: NE corner Calvert and Saratoga Sts., Baltimore, MD

  • See also: Church Home and Hospital
  • See also: College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • See also: Church Home and Infirmary
  • See also: Church Home and Hospital

Images

Washington University. Maryland State Archives

Washington University. Maryland State Archives

Washington University [announcement]. Maryland State Archives

Washington University [announcement]. Maryland State Archives

[Washington Medical College, Baltimore, Md.] / Anderson. Images from the History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

[Washington Medical College, Baltimore, Md.] / Anderson. Images from the History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

Washington Medical College [A02250]. Images of History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

Washington Medical College [A02250]. Images of History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

Washington Medical College, Baltimore, Maryland BCLM MB3089 (Z24.2063). Maryland Historical Society

Washington Medical College, Baltimore, Maryland BCLM MB3089 (Z24.2063). Maryland Historical Society

Additional Information

  • Date: var. dates
    Notes: Author(s): Washington Medical College, Baltimore.
    Title: [Collection of publications].
    NLM Unique ID: 26912330R
    Location: General Collection
    Call Number: W 19.5 AM3 B2W25Location: HMD Collection
    Call Number: W 19.5 AM3 B2W25
    Institution: National Library of Medicine
  • Date: 1825-1826
    Notes: In 1825-1826 a group of physicians led by Dr. Horation Gates Jameson, a prominent Baltimore surgeon, applied to the Maryland state legislature for a charter to found a medical college. When this request was denied because of pressure on the legislature from the already-existing University of Maryland Medical School in Baltimore, Jameson contacted Washington College in Washington, Pa., a small liberal arts college which had been founded in 1806, and secured the authorization to establish a medical school in Baltimore under its charter.
    Source: Baldwin, D.O.. “Discipline, Obedience, and Female Support Groups: Mona Wilson at the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915-1918” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 69(Winter 1995): 15
  • Date: 1827
    Notes: The new medical school first opened its doors in 1827 in its especially constructed facilities on Holliday Street, the facilities of which, as described by a contemporary source, were “less complete than the University.” To obtain the M.D. degree the students were required to attend two sessions of instruction, — although 12 were graduated at the end of the first year of the college with the explanation that they had attended other institutions previously — to pass an examination on all subjects taught by the faculty, and to present an acceptable thesis. The session began on the last Monday of October and continued for four months. Fees were as follows: Tickets $15, diploma $10, matriculation fee $5. The original faculty was composed of six members.
    Source: Baldwin, D.O.. “Discipline, Obedience, and Female Support Groups: Mona Wilson at the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915-1918” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 69(Winter 1995): 16
  • Date: 1827, Oct. 25
    Notes: WASHINGTON MEDICAL COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE
    The Introductory Lectures in this Institution will commence on MONDAY, the 29th inst. and continue through the week, at the College Building, opposite Peale’s Museum, in the following order:
    Monday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Jameson
    Tuesday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Jennings
    Wednesday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Handy
    Thursday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Miller
    Friday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Annan
    Saturday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Vethake
    Citizens generally are respectfully invited to attend.
    SAMUEL K. JENNINGS,
    Register of Medical Faculty
    Source: Commercial Chronical and Baltimore Advertiser (For the Country) (Baltimore), 1827/10/25
  • Date: 1827, Oct. 30
    Notes: WASHINGTON MEDICAL COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE
    The Introductory Lectures in this Institution will commence on MONDAY, the 29th inst. and continue through the week, at the College Building, opposite Peale’s Museum, in the following order:
    Monday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Jameson
    Tuesday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Jennings
    Wednesday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Handy
    Thursday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Miller
    Friday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Annan
    Saturday, 3 1/2 o’clock, P.M. Dr. Vethake
    Citizens generally are respectfully invited to attend.
    SAMUEL K. JENNINGS,
    Register of Medical Faculty
    Source: Commercial Chronical and Baltimore Advertiser (For the Country) (Baltimore), 1827/10/30
  • Date: 1837
    Notes: Washington Medical College.—The buildings lately erected by this institution, are said to be on the most elevated grounds within the limits of the city; they are constructed in a novel and magnificent style of architecture”. The length is 195 feet. The centre building is circular, 40 feet in diameter, and four stories in height. At equi distant points connected with the main building are four quadrangular turrets six stories high, with obelisk roofs. There are two wings each 60 by 40 feet. On the whole, the College presents a most imposing appearance.
    Source: Matchett’s Baltimore Directory for 1837 Baltimore: : 21-22
  • Date: 1839
    Notes: Iin 1839, the year after the college occupied this new building, it was so prosperous and the chances for its future appeared so bright that it obtained another charter giving it title of the Washington University of Baltimore with permission to add faculties of Law, Divinity, Arts and Sciences, and the necessary preparatory schools. But no other faculties were ever created and ten years later the “University” undertook a venture which lead to its extinction.For some reason or other, the faculty decided that their present location was too far from the city and that this was not to the best interest of the school. Therefore they undertook to erect a new building in the center of the city which was later known as the “New Assembly Rooms,” a popular place for meetings and concerts. Each professor of the school donated $1,000 to cover the cost of the new building. Lectures were held there from 1849 to 1851 when the whole venture collapsed for lack of funds. So great was the debt that the hospital building on Broadway was also sold, and the school was forced to close its doors after having graduated a total of 183 students.
    Source: Baldwin, D.O.. “Discipline, Obedience, and Female Support Groups: Mona Wilson at the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915-1918” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 69(Winter 1995): 19-20
  • Date: 1848, Oct. 31
    Notes: Washington University of Baltimore — The introductory lectures in this institution will commence on Monday evening next, at the new hall in Lombard street which it is thought will be entirely ready by that time. This institution has gained many warm friends, and promises to share more largely this winter, than usual, in the number of students which annually visit our city for purposes of medical instruction.
    Source: Sun (Baltimore) 31 Oct. 1848
  • Date: 1849
    Notes: Washington University Medical School removed from Broadway to New Assembly Rooms, northeast corner Lombard and Hanover Streets (September 17).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 701
  • Date: 1849
    Notes: The Faculty of Washington Medical University removed from Broadway to the northeast corner of Lombard and Hanover streets (New Assembly Rooms).
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 39
  • Date: 1851
    Notes: Building of Washington Univeristy on Broadway and Lombard Street sold for debt and the institution closed.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 702
  • Date: 1851, Dec.
    Notes: The Washington Medical University buildings, on Broadway, and their new hall, on Lombard street, sold for debt and the school closed.
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 39
  • Date: 1867
    Notes: The second period of the Washington University Medical College began in 1867 when a group of Confederate physicians united to forma medical school with the expressed purpose to “arrest the tide that tended Northward, and offer to the young men of the South congenial homes.” The chief instigator was Edward Warren, who had distinguished himself as Surgeon-General of North Carolina during the Civil War and who had returned to Baltimore to resume his chair as Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics at the University of Maryland. Conditions had necessitated that his chair be filled before his return, so when he did not succeed in regaining his old position, he joined with a number of physicians, most of whom were newcomers to Baltimore, to found an new school….
    Source: Baldwin, D.O.. “Discipline, Obedience, and Female Support Groups: Mona Wilson at the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915-1918” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 69(Winter 1995): 20
  • Date: 1867-1871
    Notes: The school opened in an old converted warehouse on Calvert Street and during its first year succeeded in having the Maryland legislature pass an act authorizing the erection of the Maryland Free Hospital in connection with the college. This was built acroos the street and when finished and occupied in 1871 included both the lecture rooms, dissecting rooms and hospital. The cost and upkeeping of the hospital was provided by grants from the State of Maryland in return for which the college had to treat indigent patients free of charge and to grant scholarships to one student from each senatorial district….
    Source: Baldwin, D.O.. “Discipline, Obedience, and Female Support Groups: Mona Wilson at the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1915-1918” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 69(Winter 1995): 20
  • Date: 1867, Feb. 11
    Notes: Washington Medical University reorganized. Faculty, Dr. Thos. E. Bond, Sr., President and Profess of Materia Medica; Edward Warren, of Surgery; H. L. Byrd, of Obstetrics; Jas. P. Logan, of Practice; J. W. Walls, of Anatomy; Pascal A. Quinan, of Physiology; H. St. Geo. Hopkins, Diseases of Women and Children; Jas. E. Claggett, Medical Chemistry and Pharmacy; J. n. Monmonier, Demonstrator of Anatomy, and A. H. Powell, Adjunct Surgery; C. M. Mofitt, Adjunct Practice; T. H. Wingfield, Adjunct Physiology. Lectures of Washington Medical University are held at northwest corner Calvert and Saratoga, and in 1871 at northwest corner of same streets (now City Hospital and College of Physicians and Surgeons).
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 43

Bibliography

  • Annan, Samuel, An address delivered to the graduates of Washington Medical College, Baltimore : at the annual commencement, on Monday March 17, 1834 Baltimore: John D. Toy, 1834
  • Jameson, Horatio Gates, An introductory lecture delivered at the opening of Washington Medical College of Baltimore, for 1827 & ‘8 Baltimore: Matchett, 1828

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Founded: Organized 1807.
Location: Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, MD

  • Also known as: Medical College

Images

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Maryland State Archives

University of Maryland School of Medicine. . Maryland State Archives

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Maryland State Archives

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Maryland State Archives

Hospital building, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md.. American Memory Project, Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880-1920, LC-D4-16524. Library of Congress

Hospital building, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md.. American Memory Project, Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880-1920, LC-D4-16524. Library of Congress

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. Private Collection.

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. Private Collection.

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Historic American Buildings Survey. Library of Congress

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Historic American Buildings Survey. Library of Congress

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Historic American Buildings Survey. Library of Congress

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Historic American Buildings Survey. Library of Congress

University of Maryland - School of Medicine Davidge Hall, Greene Street and Lombard Street. Hughes Studio Photograph Collection, PP 30. Maryland Historical Society

University of Maryland – School of Medicine Davidge Hall, Greene Street and Lombard Street. Hughes Studio Photograph Collection, PP 30. Maryland Historical Society

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry, Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md.. Private Collection.

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry, Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md.. Private Collection.

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. School of Medicine in foreground. American Memory Project, Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880-1920,LC-D4-16523. Library of Congress

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. School of Medicine in foreground. American Memory Project, Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880-1920,LC-D4-16523. Library of Congress

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No., A026793. National Library of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No., A026793. National Library of Medicine

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md.. Images of the History of Medicine Collection, Order No. A026827. National Library of Medicine

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md.. Images of the History of Medicine Collection, Order No. A026827. National Library of Medicine

See: University of Maryland ,Medical Building, Greene & Lombard Sts., BALTIMORE, Baltimore County, MD. 11 measured drawings, 2 b&w photos. Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record, Survey number HABS MD-304.. Library of Congress

Additional Notes

    • Dates: 1807, Dec. 18
      Notes: Medical College Bill passes Legislature (December 18).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 676
    • Dates: 1808
      Notes: Legislature grants a lottery of $40,000 for the benefit of the Medical College, afterward increased to $1000,000.
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 676
    • Dates: 1808, Dec. 27
      Notes: Board of Regents of Medical College meets and organizes with Dr. George Brown as President, Solomon Birckhead as Treasurer, and James Cocke as Secretary. Dr. Davidge elected as Dean of the Faculty. Seven students this session (December 28).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 676
    • Dates: 1810
      Notes: First public commencement of Medical College; 5 graduates.
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 677
    • Dates: 1812, May 4
      Notes: Class of five graduates at the Medical College; these are the first graduates whose names were published (May 4).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
    • Dates: 1812, May 7
      Notes: Medical College building on Lombard Street begun (May 7).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
    • Dates: 1812, Oct. 17
      Notes: Letter of James Cocke, John B. Davidge, and William Gibson relating to the College of Medicine, “to prepare a statement with regard to the condition and prospects of this institution, to the progress of the building for the accommodation of the class, to the courses of lectures to be delivered here next winter, &c.”
      Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1812/10/17, p. 111-112
    • Dates: 1812, Dec. 29
      Notes: Act founding University of Maryland passed by Legislature (December 29).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
    • Dates: 1813, Jan. 6
      Notes: University of Maryland organized (January 6).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
    • Dates: 1813, Apr. 22
      Notes: The building on Lombard Street partlyoccupied during this session (April 22).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
    • Dates: 1813, Oct. 2
      NotesReport of the committee of faculty of physick of the University of Maryland appointed to “examine into and report the present state of the Institution.”
      Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1813/10/02, p. 88
    • Dates: 1813, Nov.
      Notes: The Faculty of the University of Maryland purchases Dr. Crawford’s medical library from his widow (November).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 680
    • Dates: 1815, Jun. 5
      Notes: Meeting of Medical and Chirurgical Faculty; Dr. Ennalls Martin elected President, Dr. John Arnest, Secretary; Dr. Richard Wilmot Hall delivers oration in Anatomical Hall of the University on “The Law of Organization” (June 5).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 681
    • Dates: 1817, Jan. 16
      Notes: Legislature grants lottery scheme of $100,000 to Drs. Davidge, Potter, Baker, Gibson, McDowell and DeButts for benefit of the University (January 16).
      Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 683
    • Dates: 1818
      Notes: Description of the Medical College of Maryland.
      Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1818, p. 27-30
    • Dates: 1818
      NotesAnnouncement of University of Maryland
      Source: Federal Republican and Baltimore Telegraph (Baltimore), 1818
    • Dates: 1821
      NotesNotice mentioning reputation of school and two hundred students attending lectures.
      Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1821
    • Dates: 1822
      NotesFifty four graduates at last commencement.
      Source: Niles’ Weekly Register (Baltimore), 1822, p. 112
    • Dates: 1837
      Notes: University of Maryland.—Situation at the corner of Greene and Lombard streets. The building is formed on a classic model; the portico, is supported by eight Doric columns. It has a dome surmounting a rotunda, 60 feet in diameter. This institution has four faculties, viz. Divinity, Law, Physic, and the Arts and Sciences. To this University is attached the Baltimore College, and Baltimore Infirmary, which see. The University of Maryland was incorporated A. D. 1812.
      Source: Matchett’s Baltimore Directory for 1837 Baltimore: : 21
    • Dates: 1848, Oct. 31
      Notes: University of Maryland. — The introductory lectures in this old and established institution commenced on Monday evening, the opening lecture being delivered by Professor Smith. The several professors will follow, each delivering a lecture until all have presented their introductory. We understand that the prospects for a large class this session are highly flattering.
      Source: Sun (Baltimore) 31 Oct. 1848
    • Dates: 1910
      Notes: UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. Organized 1807. Essentially an independent institution with a University charter, though nominally the medical department of St. John’s College (Annapolis).
      Entrance requirement: Less than a high school education.
      Attendance: 316
      Teaching staff: 61, of whom 24 are professors, 37 of other grade.
      Resources available for maintenance: Fees, amounting to $44,530 (estimated), out of which dividends are paid to the faculty and a large mortgage debt carried.
      Laboratory facilities: Good undergraduate laboratories adequate to routine teaching are provided in two poorly kept buildings for the following subjects: chemistry, physiology, including physiological chemistry and histology, pathology and bacteriology. Anatomy is poor. There is a small museum. In a separate building is a large and interesting library, but it is open only two hours each day.
      Clinical facilities: The school controls its own hospital, opposite the laboratory building, about 140 beds being available for teaching. The hospital records are well kept, senior students who pay for the privilege serving as clinical assistants. A separate maternity ward furnishes obstetrical work in abundance.
      The dispensary is large, properly equipped, and well kept.
      Date of visit: March 1909.
      Source: Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 236
    • Dates: 1962
      Notes: Historic American Buildings Survey, University of Maryland,Medical Building, Greene & Lombard Sts., HABS MD-304
    • Dates: 1996-1997
      Notes: Diana S. Waite, “An architectural study blurs the picture of who designed Davidge Hall” Bulletin Winter 1996-97, Volume 81, No. 3
    • Dates: 1997
      Notes“Davidge Hall — Among America’s Elite Landmarks” Bulletin Fall 1997, Volume 82, No. 2
    • Dates: var. dates
      NotesUNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HISTORY OF THE CAMPUS

Bibliography

  • Brown, George William, Address to the medical graduates of the University of Maryland / by Geo. Wm. Brown. [Baltimore?}: Published by the Faculty of Physic, [1872?]
  • Dunglison, Robley, An address : delivered to the graduates in medicine, at the annual commencement of the University of Maryland, on Wednesday, March 19th, 1834 Baltimore: William Wooddy, Printer, 1834
  • University of Maryland. Medical Department, Memorial of the medical faculty of the University of Maryland to the legislature of Maryland. Annapolis: William M’Neir, 1837
  • University of Maryland. School of Medicine., 200 years of medicine in Baltimore : outstanding contributions of University of Maryland medical alumni and faculty. [S.l.]: [s.n.], 1976
  • University of Maryland. School of Medicine., Address of the trustees of the University of Maryland concerning the Medical Department of the institution : With an appendix containing the regulations for admission and graduation, the subjects taught by each professor, mode of instruction, &c. &c. Baltimore: Printed by John D. Toy, 1836
  • University of Maryland. School of Medicine., Memorial of the professors of the Medical College to the legislature of Maryland. [S.l.]: [s.n.],
  • University of Maryland. School of Medicine., Memorial of the professors of the Medical College to the legislature of Maryland. [S.l.]: [s.n.],
  • Woodward, Theodore E., 200 years of medicine in Baltimore : outstanding contributions of Unviersity of Maryland medical alumni

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Founded: Established 1893
Location: Baltimore, MD

Images

What the family looked like in 1892. Baltimore: Cummins,1892. 1 photomechanical print :photogravure; 21 x 14 cm. The Johns Hopkins Medical Class of 1892 and staff seated outside on steps of a building. In the foreground, left to right: W.W. Russell, Simon Flexner, O.G. Ramsey, R.R. Smith, L.J. Barker, Eugene M. Van Ness, H.A. Kelly, John G. Clark, and Rupert Norton. Back row, left to right: W.H. Baltzell, John Hewetson, J.M.T. Finney, A.L. Stavely, T.S. Cullen, Henry Hurd, W.S. Halsted, G.H.T. Nuttall, William Thayer, Hunter Robb (?), John Sedgewick Billings, and B. Lanier. Portrait no. Group 55-2 Old Negative no. 66-203 Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. School of Medicine. Title taken from caption.. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No. B011682. National Library of Medicine

What the family looked like in 1892. Baltimore: Cummins,1892. 1 photomechanical print :photogravure; 21 x 14 cm. The Johns Hopkins Medical Class of 1892 and staff seated outside on steps of a building. In the foreground, left to right: W.W. Russell, Simon Flexner, O.G. Ramsey, R.R. Smith, L.J. Barker, Eugene M. Van Ness, H.A. Kelly, John G. Clark, and Rupert Norton. Back row, left to right: W.H. Baltzell, John Hewetson, J.M.T. Finney, A.L. Stavely, T.S. Cullen, Henry Hurd, W.S. Halsted, G.H.T. Nuttall, William Thayer, Hunter Robb (?), John Sedgewick Billings, and B. Lanier. Portrait no. Group 55-2 Old Negative no. 66-203 Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. School of Medicine. Title taken from caption.. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No. B011682. National Library of Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medical School. Photograph of graduating class. Baltimore ,[between 189- and 191-]. Group portrait of unidentified Johns Hopkins Medical School graduating class with (left to right) professors Harvey Cushing, Howard Kelly, Sir William Osler, and William S. Thayer seated in foreground. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No. B011683. National Library of Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medical School. Photograph of graduating class. Baltimore ,[between 189- and 191-]. Group portrait of unidentified Johns Hopkins Medical School graduating class with (left to right) professors Harvey Cushing, Howard Kelly, Sir William Osler, and William S. Thayer seated in foreground. Images from the History of Medicine, Order No. B011683. National Library of Medicine

Additional Information

  • Dates: 1867, Aug. 24
    Notes: Johns Hopkins Hospital and University incorporated.
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 44
  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: Of the $100,000 raised to endow the Johns Hopkins Medical College, $48,000 was given by Miss Garrett.”
    Source: “Medical ItemsMaryland Medical Journal XXIV(January 24, 1891): 285
  • Dates: 1899
    Notes: Laboratory of Physiology, Physiological Chemistry and Pharamcology opened at Johns Hopkins Medical School.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 732
  • Dates: 1899
    Notes: Eugene Horwitz prize medal instituted at Johns Hopkins Medical School
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 732
  • Dates: 1910
    Notes: MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS University. Established 1893. An organic university department.
    Entrance requirement: The bachelor’s degree, representing specific attainments in chemistry, physic, biology, German, and French.
    Attendance: 297.
    Teaching staff: 112, of whom 23 are professors. All the laboratory teaching is conducted by instructors who give their entire time to teaching and research; the heads of the clinical departments are salaried teachers attached to the Johns Hopkins Hospital.
    Resources available for maintenance: The income from tuition fees is $60,542, that from endowments $19,687, making a total of $80,229. The budget calls for $102,429, not including salaries of the clinical faculty and other items carried by the Johns Hopkins Hospital, which is thus actually an integral part of the medical school. The productive hospital endowments now aggregate $3,632,289, not including the bequests for the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic and the Harriet Lane Johnson Home for Children.
    Laboratory facilities: These facilities are in every respect unexcelled. As the institution has been from the beginning on a graduate basis, teaching and research have been always equally prominent in its activities.
    Clinical facilities: The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Dispensary provide practically ideal opportunities. The medical staff of the hospital and the clinical faculty of the medical school are identical: the scientific laboratories ranged around the hospital are in close touch with clinical problems, immediate and investigative. The medical school plant is thus an organic whole, in which laboratories and clinics are inextricably interwoven. Recent foundations have greatly augmented the original hospital plant in the direction of psychiatry, pediatrics, and tuberculosis. Three hundred and eighty-five beds under complete control are now available.
    The dispensary is largely attended, and is admirably conducted from the standpoint of both public service and pedagogic efficiency.Date of visit: December, 1909.
    Source: Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 234-235

Southern Homeopathic Medical College — Atlantic Medical College

Founded: Incorporated Laws of Maryland May 1890
Closed: 1910
Location 1891-1892: Hospital office 323 N. Paca Street , Baltimore, MD
Location 1892-1900: “Calvert Hall”, on Saratoga St. west of Charles Street , Baltimore, MD
Location 1901-?: 1140 Mount Street north of Riggs Ave on grounds of Maryland Homeopathic Hospital, Baltimore, MD

  • See also: Maryland Homoeopathic Free Dispensary and Hospital
  • See also: Polyclinic Dispensary
  • See also: Southern Homoeopathic Training School for Nurses

]Additional Information

  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: The session of the Southern Homeopathic Medical Colege will open on Monday, October 5th, 1891, and will continue six months, closing with a public commencement on Wednesday, April 6th, 1892.This College was incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland in May, 1890, and the Faculty would call attention to the fact that the standard of the college will be maintained fully equal to the requirements decided upon by the American Institute of Homeopathy in 1890.It is desired to impress upon the medical profession generally, as well as upon those young men and women who contemplate studying medicine, that by devotion and earnestness on the part of the Faculty, a high order of teaching will be maintained.It is the aim of the Faculty to make the course of instruction as thoroughly practical as possible. In order to effect this, every endeavor will be made to enlarge the clinical facilities of the college through the Hospital and Dispensary with which it is connected.

    Special attention will be paid to each student, so as to furnish the advantages of personal clinical instruction by the professors.

    Source: Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Snowden & Cowman: 5

  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: THE MARYLAND HOMEOPATHIC FREE DISPENSARY AND HOSPITAL, under the auspices of the Maryland State Homeopathic Medical Society, is in a flourishing condition, and contains besides a number of private rooms, free male, female and children’s wards, which will furnish valuable clinical advantages to students.Source: Annoucement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Snowden & Cowman: 5
  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: Applicants for admission to the College must present to the Dean a certificate of good moral character and also one of graduation from a reputable literary college of high school; or a first grade teacher’s certificate; or a certificate of having passed the entrance examination to any reputable literary college; or else pass a preliminary entrance examination.The Entrance Examination will be held, prior to matriculation, on Monday, October 5th, 1891, at 4 p.m. The requirements will be the same as in all homoeopathic colleges in the United States.*Students who have attended either one or two annual terms in other accredited medical colleges must bring satisfactory certificates of qualification, or else pass the examinations of the corresponding term in this institution. They may then matriculate and be admitted to the final examination for the degree, upon completing in this College the remaining term or terms of the required three years’ course of study.Graduates in Pharmacy or Dentistry may, upon presenting their diplomas, matriculate and enter the second year of this College.

    Graduates of other accredited medical colleges may matriculate and enter the third or graduating term upon complying with the rules governing students who have attended two terms in another college.

    * In conformity with the action of the American Institute of Homoeopathy at its last meeting, after 1891 students not able to present the necessary diploma or certificate will be required to pass an examination as follows:
    1. English composition, by writing at the time of the examination an essay of not less than two hundred words, bu which may be judged the writer’s attainments in grammar, spelling, and writing
    2. Arithmetic as far as square root.
    3. Geography, physical and political, such as is contained in advanced school geographies.
    4. History; the outlines of history of modern civilized nations, especially American history, such as is contained in the ordinary manuals of history.
    5. Latin, sufficient to ready easy prose and to give a fair comprehension of scientific terms and formulae.
    6. Physics, such as is comprised in Balfour Stewart’s Primer of Physics.
    7. Biology and physiology, as much as is comprised in the briefer course of Martin’s Human Body.
    8. Chemistry as comprised in Miller’s Elementary Chemistry.
    9. Botany as found in the elementary manuals.

    Source: Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Snowden & Cowman: 6-7

  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: A Department of Dentistry will be opened in the fall of 1892 with complete appointements, under the charge of a most skilled and experienced operator, Professor F.W. Schloendorn.Source: ,Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Snowden & Cowman: 12
  • Dates: 1891
    Notes: A candidate for graduation must be at least twenty-one years of age and of good moral and professional standing; he must have studied medicine for four years, including attendance upon three full graded courses, the last of which must have been in this college; and he must have had one course each of practical instruction in anatomy, chemistry, histology, obstetrics and surgery.The candidate must have attended lectures of the course regularly, nor absented himself except for reasons of an imperative character. To constitute a full course, the absence, in any event, must not have exceeded one month, in the aggregate.He must give notice to the Dean on or before the first of March of his desire to graduate, and exhibit his tickets or other satisfactory evidence of having complied with the rules of the college; he must have paid all fees and also deposit with the Dean the graduation fee of thirty dollars (returnable if the candidate be rejected) before the permit for examination can be issued.

    The final examination will be conducted in private by each professor, and each candidate will be voted for by ballot.

    A candidate who fails to pass the examination will be required to attend another annual course of lectures, for which no charge will be made before applying for re-examination.

    Successful candidates will be formally notified and their names reported to the Board of Trustees in order that, with the approval of said Board, their mandamus may be issued for conferring the degree of Doctor of Medicine, at the Commencement which will be held as soon as possible after the close of the examination.

    The successful candidate must be present at Commencement exercises to receive his diploma in person.

    Source: Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Snowden & Cowman: 12-13

  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: The College is located in the centre of the City, on Saratoga street, between Charles and Cathedral, and is easily accessible by street cars from all railway stations and steamboat lines, as well as from all parts of the City.Source: Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 8
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: The Polyclinic Dispensary of the College covers a space of 50 by 75 feet on the first floor, and is divided into a large waiting room and hall, opening into eight well-lighted clinic rooms 20 by 15 feet each, and a Pharmacy. Upon the right of the entrance are seen the Eye and Ear Department, with dark room adjoining; and immediately following are rooms for Gynaecology, Surgery and Surgical Diseases, Diseases of Children and Orthopaedic Surgery and Diseases of the Throat, Nose and Chest. Opposite are the rooms for treatment of Diseases of the Skin and Genito-Urinary Organs, Diseases of the Nervous System, General Medical Diseases and the Pharmacy. In the rear, upon the same floor, are located the coat rooms, with Lavatory adjoining, the Morgue and Boiler-room being in the rear.Source: Second Annual Annoucement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 8
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Upon the second floor front are the offices of the Dean and Registrar and Alumni Hall, followed on either side by Anatomical Hall and Chemical Hall. These halls are all used for lectures and are handsomely furnished with single theatre chairs, and having a seating capacity of 400 in the aggregate. In the rear of Chemical Hall is the Chemical Laboratory, with stands for 24 students. The Faculty Room and Lavatory for the Faculty completes this floor.On the third floor are located the Men’s Dissecting Room, one of the largest and best equipped extant, and the Physiological Laboratory, Obstetrical and Surgical Demonstration Rooms, Women’s Dissecting Room, Museum, Pathological Laboratory and the Women’s Study and Toilet Rooms, all of which are commodious and fully equipped. The building is heated throughout by steam.
    Source: Second Annual Annoucement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 8
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Hospital Facilities
    The Maryland Homoepathic Hospital is controlled by the Faculty, and offers every requirement for the sick or injured, both in the private rooms and public wards, which are in charge of a corps of trained nurses, directed by an efficient superintendent. Almost from its opening day its wards have been well filled. A large portion of the building is used as a City Hospital and contains charity beds supported by the City of Baltimore. This department of the Hospital is taxed to its utmost capacity to afford accomodations for patients seeking admission. Accident cases (never rare in a great city), as well as patients suffering from the various general medical and surgical diseases, occupy the beds and add greatly tot he facilities for clinical teaching enjoyed by the school.This portion of the hospital is conducted with the special purpose of furnishing clinical material to be used in illustration of the lectures. The arrangement of the building is well adapted for clinical purposes, and the Faculty is thus in position to make prominent this important feature of a medical course. In addition to the regular clinical Lectures in the amphitheater, much attention is also devoted to strictly bedside instruction, in which the third year students in classes are required to accompany the physician or surgeon through the wards, and to thus become practically familiar with the methods of diagnosis and treatment.
    Source: ,Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 8
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Bay View Asylum and Hospital
    This large and expensive charity, belonging to the City of Baltimore, is now accessible to all Medical Students, free of charge, and it offers advantages for studying and seeing almost every form and variety of disease and accident.It is situated on the eastern suburbs of Baltimore, and contains 1,000 beds, exclusive of 250 in the Insane Department.Regular clinics are given during the winter and spring sessions by the visiting staff. The amphitheaters are well lighted and comfortable, and the very large amount of clinical material affords unusual opportunities for practical teaching.

    The number of deaths occurring in an institution of this size affords the fullest opportunity for witnessing post-mortem examinations and the study of pathological phenomena.
    Source: Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 8

  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Resident Students
    A limited number of advanced students can obtain special hospital advantages. Accommodations are provided in a building adjacent to the Hospital for four resident students, who are known as INTERNES. To theses are assigned wards in the hospital, with attendance upon the sick under the daily supervision of the professors of the College and the resident physician. Special attention is called to the fact that under-graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of constant observation of the sick, and of receiving daily beside instruction from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is the rule adopted in order that the experience of the student may be as varied as possible.The resident physician is selected annually in April, from among the graduates of the College.
    Source: Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 11
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Free Lying-In Hospital Department
    A ward in the Hospital devoted to midwifery is open during the entire year, and furnishes every student in attendance upon the lectures of this school, invaluable clinical advantages in the study of midwifery. The clinics are held in the lying-in chamber, and attendance on them by the graduating class, in sections, is obligatory.Source: Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 11
  • Dates: 1892-1893
    Notes: Out Patient Department
    An Out-door Department has also been established in connection with the Lying-In Department, which will greatly extend the facilities for practical instruction in Obstetrics. Advanced students will be given charge of special cases under personal supervision of the Professor and Demonstrator of Obstetrics.Source: Second Annual Announcement of the Southern Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, session of 1891-2 Baltimore: Press of Thomas & Evans: 11
  • Dates: 1910
    Notes: ATLANTIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Organized 1891 as an independent homeopathic institution. Having “passed through many vicissitudes,” it is now non-sectarian.
    Entrance requirement:Nominal.
    Attendance: 43, or whom 31 are in the senior class, 1 in the freshman class. Of 21 graduates, class of 1908, almost all had failed at other schools or before the regular state board before entering the Atlantic Medical College, on graduation from which they could appear before the Homeopathic State Board of Maryland, “reputed to be a much easier board to pass.”
    Teaching staff: 47, of whom 12 are professors, 35 of other grade. Two members of the teaching staff were graduated in the class of 1908, above mentioned, after having failed before the regular state board; a third instructor, also a graduate of 1908, entered this school after failure at the local College of Physicians and Surgeons.
    Resources available for maintenance: Fees, amounting to $3905 (estimated).
    Laboratory facilities: The school occupies a filthy building, in which are to be found an elementary chemical laboratory, a small room assigned to pathology, bacteriology, and histology, equipment being scant and dirty, an ordinary dissecting-room, a lecture-room with half a skeleton, a small amount of imperfect physiological apparatus with a few frogs, and a few cases of books, mostly old and useless.
    Clinical facilities: These are claimed at a small private hospital several miles off. They can at best be hardly more than nominal.
    The basement of the college building is used for a dispensary.
    Date of visit: March 1909.Source: Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 238

College of Physicians and Surgeons

Founded: Established 1872.
Location: Baltimore, MD

  • See also: University of Maryland
  • See also: Washington University School of Medicine

Images

[Anatomy - History: Dissecting Rooms, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore]. Illustrated in Annual Announcement, 1893-1894. Images from the History of Medicine Collection, Order No. A016205. National Library of Medicine

[Anatomy – History: Dissecting Rooms, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore]. Illustrated in Annual Announcement, 1893-1894. Images from the History of Medicine Collection, Order No. A016205. National Library of Medicine

Mercy Hospital and College of Physicians and Surgeons. Private Collection.

Mercy Hospital and College of Physicians and Surgeons. Private Collection.

Additional Information

  • Date: 1899, Jul.
    Notes: “The New College Building,” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore Jul. 1899: 33-35
  • Date: 1899, Oct.
    Notes: “The Teaching of Practical Medicine” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore October, 1899: 89-90
  • Date: 1901, Jan.
    Notes: Dr. William H. Welch, “The Material Needs of Medical Education. Address at the Opening of the New Building of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore, December 21, 1899.” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore Jan. 1900: 97-106.
  • Date: 1900, Jan.
    Notes: “In a Field Hospital” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore Jan. 1900: 113-116.
  • Date: 1900, Jan.
    Notes: “City Hospital Operating-Room” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore Jan. 1900: 126-127
  • Date: 1900, Jan.
    Notes: “Opening of the New College Building” In: Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore Jan. 1900: 127-128
  • Date: 1901, Apr.
    Notes: Announcements
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore April 1901, p. 25.
  • Date: 1901, Apr.
    Notes: Commencement
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore April 1901, p. 25.
  • Date: 1901, Jul.
    Notes: Post-Graduate Courses for Alumni
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore July 1901, p. 57-58.
  • Date: 1901, Oct.
    Notes: Dr. W. F. Lockwood, “Extract from the Introduction Address: Session of 1901-2
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore October 1901, pp. 65-70
  • Date: 1901, Oct.
    Notes: The College
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore October 1901, pp. 89-90
  • Date: 1901, Oct.
    Notes: Post-Graduate Courses
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore October 1901, pp. 90.
  • Date: 1902, Jan.
    Notes:  College Medical Society
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore January 1902, pp. 122-123
  • Date: 1902, Jan.
    Notes: Phi Betta Pi
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore January 1902, pp. 123-124
  • Date: 1902, Jan.
    Notes: Nurses Commencement
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore January 1902, pp. 125
  • Date: 1902, Jan.
    Notes: The Post-Graduate Course
    Source: The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore January 1902, pp. 125-126
  • Date: 1910
    Notes: COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. Established 1872. An independent institution.
    Entrance requirement: Less than a high school education.
    Attendance: 252
    Teaching staff: 59, of whom 21 are professors, 38 of other grade. One teacher devotes his entire time to medical instruction.
    Resources available for maintenance: Fees, amounting to $39,000.
    Laboratory facilities: Ordinary working laboratories are provided for bacteriology, histology, and pathology, including surgical pathology; the chemical laboratory provides satisfactorily for general chemistry. The dissecting-room is fair, as far as it goes. There is no experimental pharmacology and no student work in experimental physiology. The museum consists of several hundred specimens; the library, of which there is a librarian in charge, of perhaps 1500 volumes and a few current periodicals. The undeveloped character of the laboratories is due, (1) to the payment of faculty dividends; (2) to the application of current fee income to the discharge of building debts.
    Clinical facilities: The school completely controls the adjoining hospital, of which some 210 beds, including a maternity ward, are available for teaching. Ward-teaching on the section plan is in use. The clinical laboratory is open to the students.
    The dispensary occupies an excellent suite of rooms; the attendance is ample.
    Date of visit: March, 1909.Source: Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 235-235.

Woman’s Medical College of Baltimore

Founded: Opened 1882
Closed: ca. 1910
Location 1882-1885: 126 North Eutaw Street, near Franklin Street, Baltimore, MD
Location 1882-1887?: Hiss property on McCulloh Street, Baltimore, MD
Location 1887-1888: 510 N. Eutaw above Franklin, Baltimore, MD
Location 1888-1895: SE corner Hoffman Street, Baltimore, MD
Location 1895-ca. 1910: corner of McCulloh and Hoffman Sts., Baltimore, MD

  • See also: Hospital of Good Samaritan
  • See also: Women’s and Child’s Hospital and Dispensary

Additional Information

  • Dates: 1901
    Notes: Has an obstetrical department.Source: Charity Organization Society, Directory of the Charitable and Beneficent Organizations of Baltimore together with Legal Suggestions, Etc. Baltimore: : 51
  • Dates: 1910
    Notes: WOMAN’S MEDICAL COLLEGE OF Baltimore. Organized 1882. An independent institution.
    Entrance requirement: Less than a high school education.
    Attendance: 22.
    Teaching staff: 31, of whom 18 are professors, 13 of other grade.
    Resources available for maintenance: Fees, amounting to $2000.
    Laboratory facilities: Small laboratories, scrupulously well kept, show a desire to do the best possible with meager resources: pathology, bacteriology, embryology, chemistry, and anatomy are thus taught.
    Clinical facilities: These are quite insufficient: across the street from the school is a hospital with 17 beds; supplementary material is obtained at several institutions through staff connections.
    A suite of rooms in the college building is devoted to dispensary purposes. There is a fair attendance. Date of visit: March, 1909.Source: Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching New York: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 237

University of Maryland School of Dentistry

Location: Baltimore, MD

Images

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry, Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Private Collection.

University of Maryland, School of Medicine Administration Building, and Dentistry, Pharmacy and Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Private Collection.

University of Maryland, Dental Department, Baltimore, Md., A026794. Images from the History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

University of Maryland, Dental Department, Baltimore, Md., A026794. Images from the History of Medicine Collection. National Library of Medicine

Additional Information

Bibliography

  • McCauley, H.B., “Professional Dentistry and the University of Maryland at Baltimore” Bulletin of the History of Dentistry (30): 73-91
  • McCauley, H.B., “The century old Dental Department of the University of Maryland at Baltimore” Journal Maryland State Dental Association (25): 96-102