James Smith

Birth: 1771
Death: 1841, Jun. 12
Occupation: doctor

Associated Counties

  • Baltimore City

Directories

Date Name Occupation Address City
1814-1815 James Smith physician & U.S. agent for vaccination Chatham Street near Washington Square Baltimore City
1816 James Smith physician & United States’ agent for vaccination 6 Chatham Street Baltimore City
1819 James Smith U.S. agent of vaccinations corner of Pleasant Street & St. Paul’s Lane Baltimore City
1799 James Smith doctor Lemmon Alley, between East & Baltimore Streets Baltimore City
1800-1801 James Smith doctor Lemmons Alley Baltimore City
1804 James Smith M.D. S Frederick Street Baltimore City
1802 James Smith doctor 5 Calvert Street Baltimore City
1796 James Smith doctor 56 N Gay Street Baltimore City
1796 James Stewart doctor 23 S Gay Street Baltimore City
1810 James Smith doctor Chatham Street between Calvert & Street Paul’s Lane Baltimore City
1804 James Smith M.D. Chatham Street Baltimore City
1817-1818 James Smith United States agent for vaccination corner of Pleasant St. and St. Paul’s Lane extended Baltimore City
1803 James Smith M.D. 5 south Calvert St. Baltimore City
1804 James Smith M.D. South Street Baltimore City
1822-1823 James Smith vaccine institution SW corner of St. Paul’s Lane and Pleasant St Baltimore City
1833 James Smith doctor Franklin St west of Charles Baltimore City
1829 James Smith M.D. vaccine agent SW corner of St. Paul’s and Pleasant Sts. Baltimore City
1827 James Smith M.D. SW corner G Pleasant and Courtland Baltimore City
1831 James Smith doctor Franklin St west of Charles Baltimore City
1824 James Smith M.D. SW corner of St. Paul’s Lane, and Pleasant St Baltimore City
1881 James Smith doctor 70 Oak Baltimore City

Additional Information

  • Dates:
    Notes: (Jenner of America), State and City and U.S. Vaccine Agent
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 273
  • Dates: 1797/09/16
    Notes: Board of Health establishes a temporary hospital encampment for the sick north of the City Hospital site and assigns Drs. Joseph Whay and James Smith as attending physicians (September 16).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 669
  • Dates: 1797/09/16
    Notes: “The Board of Health establish a temporary encampment for the sick, north of the City Hospital, and assign Drs. Jos. Way and Jas. Smith to it as its attending physicians.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 20
  • Dates: 1800
    Notes: “In the summer of this year (1800) Mr. Ring, of London, sent Dr. John Crawford of Baltimore, some vaccine virus, which was successfully used by Dr. Crawford in Baltimore. (This was contemporaneous with its earliest use by B. Waterhouse, July 8, 1800, see Ring on Cowpox, 1801. p. 459.). The supply of Waterhouse and Crawford gave out with these experiments, and Dr. Waterhouse’s second supply arrived in the spring of 1801, at the same time with that of Dr. James Smith.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 22
  • Dates: 1800/09/05
    Notes: Dr. James Smith opens his house to yellow fever sufferers. City authorities admit that the epidemic is yellow fever. Lime, ashes and lye to be used as disinfectants (September 5).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 672
  • Dates: 1800/09/05
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith opens his own house to the Yellow Fever sufferes. City authorities now admit that it is Yellow Fever.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 22
  • Dates: 1800-1
    Notes: Served as Attending Physician, Baltimore City and County Alms House, 1800-1
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 250
  • Dates: 1800-1808
    Notes: Assessment Book 1800, p. 136; 1801-1803, p. 345; 1804-1808, p. 394
    Source:
  • Dates: 1801
    Notes: See also: Smith, James, The additional number to the Letters of Humanitas together with John Hillen’s, William Jenkin’s & Doctor M’Kenzie’s letters, and other documents, relative to Polly Elliott’s case : to which is added, Mr. Jesse Hollingsworth’s letter, and a reply to the same(Baltimore [Md. : s.n.], 1801.)

    “The editors of the Federal gazette having omitted such parts of the following letters as were disagreeable to themselves, the present copy may be esteemed more accurate[signed] J.S.”–p. [2

    “Appendix” deals with the yellow fever epidemic of 1800-1801.

    Master microform held by: Readex.

    References: Shaw & Shoemaker, 1332

    Microopaque. New York, N.Y. : Readex Microprint Corporation, 1964. 1 card ; 15 x 23 cm. (Early American imprints. Second series ; no. 1332)
    Source:

  • Dates: 1801
    Notes: Dr. James Smith, of Baltimore, vaccinates with virus procured from the physician of St. Pancras Hospital, London, by Mr. John Taylor, and sent by him to his brother, William Taylor, of Baltimore, who gives the supply to his family physician, Dr. Miles Littlejohn, and he, to have it tested, gives it to Dr. Smith, who makes successful trial of it at Almshouse (May 1), first on the person of a child name Nancy Malcolm, and later upon others (Dr. Smith publihsed the history of these cases in the Baltimore Telegram, December 5 and 8, 1801, and also in the Vaccine Inquirier, 1822.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 673
  • Dates: 1801
    Notes: SMITH, Dr. James, and Miss Caldwell were married last Sun. by Rev. Alexander. (Baltimore Federal Gazette, 19 Oct. 1801)
    Source: Barnes, Robert, Marriages and Deaths from Baltimore Newspapers 1796-1816 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.: 297
  • Dates: 1801/01/09
    Notes: “Baltimore General Dispensary organized by Drs. Crawford, James Smith, Robert H. Archer et al. (incorporated 1807).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 22
  • Dates: 1801/05/01
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith of Baltimore introduces Vaccination from matter procured from the physician of St. Pancras Hospital, London, by Mr. John Taylor, and sent by him to his brother Wm. Taylor of Baltimore, who gave the supply to his family physician, Dr. Miles Littlejohn, and the latter to Dr. James Smith, who made a successful trial of it at the Alms-house (May 1), and subsequently upon others; the history of which cases he published in the press (Baltimore Tel., Dec. 5, 8), also in The Vaccine Inquirer, 1822.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 23
  • Dates: 1801/06/09
    Notes: reports 2016 inmates during the year at the Almshouse during meeting of the Medical and Churirgical Faculty of Maryland,
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 23
  • Dates: 1801/06/09
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith reports 2016 inmates at Alms-hoiuse during the year.


    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 23

  • Dates: 1802
    Notes: Dr. James Smith establishes a Vaccine Institute at his residence (March 25); this institution, one of the objects of which was to provide vaccine virus gratuitously to the poor, was maintained by Dr. Smith at his own expense until 1832. The services of this physician in promoting the introduction and spread of this great boon and in repeatedly arresting epidemics of smallpox, entitle him to the eternal gratitude of this community.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 674
  • Dates: 1802/03/24
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith proposes a plan to secure the free distribution of vaccine matter to the poor; which plan is approved by the Mayor, Trustees of the Poor of Baltimore County, and by 22 leading members of the Medical Faculty.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 23
  • Dates: 1802/03/25
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith establishes a Vaccine Institute at his dwelling, No. 5 Calvert Street, and continued it either there or at other places in the city, while he lived (this is the first institution of the kind in the United States).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 23
  • Dates: 1803/05/06
    Notes: Vaccine Innoeulation
    THE patrons of the Vaccine Innoculation are requested to recommend to all the poor, who have not yet been secured from an attack of the small pox, to the subscriber; who attends for that purpose, every morning, from 8 to 9 I’clock, at his inoculation room, no. 5, South Calvert street.
    JAMES SMITH, Physician
    March 30.

    From Republican; or, Anti-Democrat (Baltimore: Charles Prentiss), Friday, May 6, 1803.
    Source:

  • Dates: 1809
    Notes: Legislature grants lottery in aid of Dr. James Smiths Vaccine Institute, but nothing ever realized from it.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 677
  • Dates: 1810
    Notes: CHAP. CXXIII, Laws of 1809: An ACT authorising a Lottery for the preservation and distribution
    of the Vaccine Matter, for the use of the Citizens of this State. Passed Jan. 6, 1810.
    Source:
  • Dates: 1810
    Notes: Smallpox appears but is soon extinguished by vaccination through the efforts of Dr. James Smith and others.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 677
  • Dates: 1810
    Notes: Vaccine Society in aid of Institute organized by Bishop Carroll, Rev. Dr. Bend, William Gwynn, Esq., Dr. James Smith and others.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 677
  • Dates: 1810
    Notes: CHAP. CXXIII. Laws of 1809: An Act authorising a Lottery for the preservation and distribution of the Vaccine Matter, for the use of the Citizens of this State. Passed Jan. 6, 1810
    Source:
  • Dates: 1810
    Notes: Dr. James Smith becomes Treasurer of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty, giving $1500 bond, Dr. Solomon Birckhead being his security.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 678
  • Dates: 1812
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith addresses a circular letter to each member of Congress, setting forth the advantages of Vaccine and inclosing [sic] them a supply of matter.
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 26
  • Dates: 1812
    Notes: Dr. James Smith addresses a circular letter to each M.C. setting forth the advantages of vaccination and enclosing virus.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 678
  • Dates: 1812/01/26
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith offers, through the press, to inspect cases of vaccination and to decide upon their genuineness, and to distribute matter gratuitously at his Institute in Chatham Street. He visits Calvert County, Maryland, and extinguishes there a threatened epidemic of smallpox.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 26
  • Dates: 1812/01/26
    Notes: Dr. James Smith extinguishes a threatened epidemic of smallpox in Calvert County (January 26).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 678
  • Dates: 1812/01/28
    Notes: MISTAKES IN VACCINATION

    No. 1
    Mr. Hewes
    We daily hear of persons taking the Natural Small Pox after having been vaccinated; and at this time find many respectable citizens urgent to get their children inoculated in the old way. That any unfortunate accident whatever should occur in vaccination is indeed much to be lamented; but to reflecting minds it ought not to be at all surprising that many mistakes should happen in a practice so novel to us all; but which, however simple and easy, is nevertheless perhaps yet but very imperfectly understood by any one.

    The various reports which have been and still continue to be so industriously circulated in this city, and which have had so much influence and excited so great an alarm in the public mind, have been strictly attended to; many of them have been carefully traced to their origin. But I have not yet been able to discover any one circumstance that ought to invalidate in the slightest degree our full confidence in the Kine Pock as a certain and perfect preventive of the Small Pox.

    If you and the public are not wearied with my frequent publications on this subject, and would in any wise be gratified which such development of the various mistakes which happened in the practice of vaccination, as I may be capable of affording. (and I am sorry to say that many of the mistakes I shall be obliged to notice have been attended with the most fatal circumstances) I will undertake the task with cheerfulness, and be happy if in this employment I may be found the humble instrument of saving any one from that severe scourge of the human race — the Natural Small-Pox.

    JAMES SMITH
    Superintendant of the Vaccine Institution, Chatham Street.

    From: Federal Gazette & Baltimore Daily Advertiser, January 28, 1812.
    Source:

  • Dates: 1812/02/06
    Notes: “Vaccine or Jennerian Society reorganized, Dr. James Steuart, President; Jas. Smith, Secretary.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 26
  • Dates: 1812/02/06
    Notes: Jennerian Society organized, Bishop Kemp, President; Dr. James Smith, Secretary (February 6).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 678
  • Dates: 1812/02/16
    Notes: Thirty-eight leading physicians of the city offer to vaccinate gratuitously and to pay each child presenting proof of genuine vaccination, twenty-five cents; Dr. James Smith distributes virus and inspects vaccine marks free (February 16).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
  • Dates: 1812/02/18
    Notes: VACCINATION.
    To facilitate the exertions of those humane citizens, who are now endeavouring to banish the natural Small Pox from among us, the subscriber will go out during this and the next succeeding month, to vaccinate gratuitously in any part of the city and precincts, where there are many poor persons residing, who cannot conveniently attend at this Institution or the Dispensary, during the present inclement season.

    As a suitable encouragement moreover, to others who may find it convenient to pay some attention to their indigent neighbours, and who can collect ten or more of them together in any one place: to receive the Kine Pock, the subscriber will not only secure them from the Small Pox; but if required, he will vaccinate or [?], the person or family who may collect them together and make no charge whatever against them for his services.

    It may be here remarked, that a more safe and equally certain test of the security of any person against the Small Pox may be obtained by reinserting genuine Vaccine Virus than can be had by resorting to the use of Small Pox matter; and it is much to be feared lest some mischief will be yet done by trying the variolous matter before the unsusceptibility of the system to its action is properly ascertained by the true vaccine test. There can however be no reasonable objection to satisfy timid parents by inoculating their children or even exposing them to the contagion of the natural Small Pox, after it is first well known that they cannot be injured by it.

    The free people of colour are informed that the subscriber will attend at the African meeting house in Sharp-st. on this</i. and every Tuesday evening during the present & next month at half past 3 o'clock, to give the Kine Pock, gratis, to all poor persons of their class; not to exclude any one, such free persons as do not wish to be considered poor, will be vaccinated on the same terms, as established at the Vaccine Institution. They are particularly urged not to neglect this offer.

    Vaccination is performed at this Institution every day from 8 to 10 o’clock. An accurate record of every case is carefully kept, and every necessary precaution taken whereby the mistakes which might otherwise occur, may be with certainty avoided. No expense is required except, a FEE OF ONE DOLLAR, to be paid at the time of entering the name of the patient in my book. Certificates of their safety against Small Pox will be delivered, free of any cost, to all of those who take the kine pock effectually.

    JAMES SMITH
    Director of the Vaccine Institution,
    Chatham-street

    From: Federal Gazette & Baltimore Daily Advertiser, February 18, 1812.
    Source:

  • Dates: 1812/02/29
    Notes: “Lottery drawn for the benefit of Vaccine Institute; managers, Drs. Cromwell, Clendenen (W.H.), and Jas. Smith.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 26
  • Dates: 1812/03/17
    Notes: Dr. Edward Jenner, of England, test Dr. James Smith’s virus and finds it genuine (March 17).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
  • Dates: 1813
    Notes: United States Government establishes National Vaccine Institute at Baltimore, with Dr. James Smith as Agent.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 679
  • Dates: 1813
    Notes: “United States establishes a National Vaccine Institute, and Dr. James Smith appointed its agent.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 27
  • Dates: 1813/05/14
    Notes: A Certain Preservative against
    the Natural Small Pox.

    The subscriber having been appointed by the President of the United States, agent for Vaccination, hereby give notice, that genuine Vaccination Matter, will be furnished to any Physician or other Citizen of the U.S. who may apply to him for it. The application must be made by Post (except from the citizens of Maryland) the requisite fee, a 5 dollars bank note, forwarded with it. When required such directions, & c. how to use it will be furnished with the matter, as will enable any discret person who can read and write to secure his own family or neighbours from the small pox, with the greatest certainty and without any trouble or danger. All letters to or from the subscribers on this subject, and not exceeding half an ounce in weight, are carried by the U.S. Mail, free of any postage, in conformity to a late act of Congress entitled “An act to encourage Vaccination.”

    JAMES SMITH, U.S. Agent
    for Vaccination, Baltimore.

    From: American & Commercial Daily Advertiser, May 14, 1813.
    Source:

  • Dates: 1814/01/26
    Notes: Beneficial Society for prevention of hydrophobia founded by Drs. Henry Wilkins, James Smith, William Donaldson, Samuel Baker, James Page and Elisha DeButts (January 26).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 680
  • Dates: 1814/01/26
    Notes: “Beneficial Society for the prevention of Hydrophobia organized by Drs. H. Wilkins, James Smith, Wm. Donaldson, Baker, Page, and DeButts.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 27
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: Dr. James Smith memorializes Congress to extend benefits of vaccination to Army and Navy
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 681
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: Dr. P.K. Rogers, of Fells Point, Baltimore, persists in inoculating against the public remonstrance of Dr. James Smith. Dr. Smith notifies the public, that although the Act of 1809 has expired, he will still furnish vaccine virus gratuitously to all.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 681
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: Threatened smallpox epidemic at Baltimore stamped out by Dr. James Smith and others.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 681
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: “Smallpox appears, but is extinguished by vaccination, in the hands of Drs. Clendinen, Smith, Allender, Martin, O’Connor, et al.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 27
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith notifies the public that although the act of 1809 has expired, he is still willing to furnish vaccine gratuitously to all. ”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 27-28
  • Dates: 1816
    Notes: “Dr. Smith memorializes Congress to extend the benefits of vaccination to the army and navy of the United States.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 27
  • Dates: 1819
    Notes: Dr. James Smith inoculates with variolous matter, his two sons, nephew, ward and only daughter (all of whom he had previously vaccinated) at the bedside of a smallpox patient, to give public proof of his faith in the prophylactic virtues of vaccine virus (January 17, Federal Gazette, December 18, 1821).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 685
  • Dates: 1819/01/17
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith inoculates with variolous matter his two sons, nephew, ward, and only daughter (all of whom he had previously vaccinated) at the bedside of smallpox patient, in order to give public proof of his faith in Jenner’s remedy (see Federal Gazette, Dec. 18, 1821).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 29
  • Dates: 1820
    Notes: “Physicians attending yellow fever in Baltimore, 1819-20, were: Allender (Jos.); Alexander (Ashton); Baker (Sam.); Brevitt (Jos.); Clark (M.D.); Clendinen (Wm. Haslett and Alexander); Diffenderfer (Mich.); Dunan (L.M.); Dorsey (Robt. E.); Dorsey (Henry); Ealer (Peter); Elbert; Gillingham (Ezra); Giraud (J.J.); Hall (R.W.); Henderson (Josiah); Jennings (Sam. K.); Johnstone (Henry); Martin (S.B.); Macauly (P.); O’Connor (John); Owen (John); Page (James); Potter (N.); Reese (D.M.); Stewart (W.A.); Smith (Jas.); Taylor (J.B.); Murphy (Thos. L.); Caldwell (J.B.); Readell.

    Of the noble exertions of these men the Mayor says: ‘In adverting to this calamity I should commit an act of injustice were I to omit to notice the humane and magnanimous exertions of those medical gentlemen residing in or near the vicinity of the infected district, and those who extended their assistance when the disease had attained its greatest extent and malignity; some time previous to which period, the more wealthy of our citizens and their families from within the district had removed, and very few remained except those who, by their deprivation of their means of support or from extreme indigence were able to afford but little prospect to the physician of pecuniary renumeration, equal to that which he might actually be called upon to expend from his own means on this account. They still perservered and attended indiscriminately all, the rich and poor, suffering no consideration to deter them from the indulgence of their philanthropic feelings. As the cases multiplied the calls upon them increased, and their natural rest was destroyed and their anxieties strained to such a pitch that their own lives appeared likely to become a sacrifice to their disinterested zeal.’ (Mayor Johnson’s Rep. In Doc. of this Ep., pp. 179-80).”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 29

  • Dates: 1820/03/20
    Notes: “The City Council in partial recognition of services and expenses for medicine by the physicians of East Baltimore, grant them $1500. They also granted a small sum to Drs. J.C.S. Monkur, L. Rodriguez, and the widow of Dr. John O’Connor.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 30
  • Dates: 1822
    Notes: Law establishing United States Vaccine Agency at Baltimore under Dr. James Smith, repealed.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 687
  • Dates: 1822/01/28
    Notes: Vaccine Society reorganized, Dr. James Steuart President, Dr. James Smith, Secretary (January 28).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 687
  • Dates: 1822/01/28
    Notes: “Vaccine Society reorganized, Rt. Rev. Bishop Kemp, President; Revs. John Glandy, J.J. Moranvill, J.P.K. Henshaw, M.E. Wyatt, Vice-Presidents; Drs. Jno. Gibson, Treasurer; Jas. Smith, Secretary. They report 1028 unvaccinated persons in Baltimore; 994 vaccinations by the Society, of which 696 were gratuitous; 340 had smallpox.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 31
  • Dates: 1822/03/15
    Notes: <i.Vaccine Inquirer
    issued, Dr. James Smith, Editor (March 15).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 687
  • Dates: 1822/03/15
    Notes:Vaccine Inquirer, issued by James Smith and others.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 31
  • Dates: 1822/07/10
    Notes: Dr. James Smith granted a patent for a new and useful improvement in the art of vaccinating (July 10).
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 687
  • Dates: 1841
    Notes: Deaths: Drs. S.S. Dickinson, at Trappe, Talbot County, aet. 70; Wm. N. Baker, at Baltimore, February 16, aet. 30; James Smith, at Pikesville, June 12, aet. 70; S. G. Baker, at Baltimore, August 1, aet. 26; Morgan Brown, in Kent County, October 6, aet. 72; John Tyler, at Fredericktown, October 15, aet. 78.
    Source: Cordell, Eugene Fauntleroy, Medical Annals of Maryland 1799-1899 Baltimore: The Medical and Chirurgical Faculty for the State of Maryland: 697
  • Dates: 1841
    Notes: “Dr. James Smith (of vaccination fame) ob. aet. 70.”
    Source: Quinan, John Russell, Medical Annals of Baltimore from 1608 to 1880, including Events, Men and Literature to which is added a Subject Index and Record of Public Services Baltimore: Press of Isaac Friedenwald: 37

Bibliography

  • Meigs, Josiah, Memorial of Josiah Meigs, and others, for an act of incorporation of a national vaccine institution for the United States of America. January 5, 1820. Read, and referred to a select committee. Washington: Gales & Seaton. 8 p. 25 cm. ([U.S. 16th Congress, 1st Sess. Executive papers] 29.)
    “The the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America.”
    Dates at end Jan. 1, 1820, and signed by Josiah Meigs, W.H. Clendinen, and four others, includings James Smith, the U.S. agent of vaccination. The memorialists were members of a “board of managers” chosen to organize the proposed national vaccine institution.
  • Smith, James, Two letters relative to the Vaccine Institution, addressed to the members of the Hon, the General Assembly of Maryland, by James Smith, United States’ agent of vaccination. Baltimore: n. pl.. [2], 35 p. 20 cm.
    The letters are signed by the author from the General Vaccine Institution, Baltimore, and dated Jan. 1st and 3d, 1818.
  • Smith, James, To the Honble. the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, the memorial of James Smith, agent of vaccination. Georgetown,: W.A. Rind and Co.. 16 p. 23 cm.
    The memorial, which includes “Outlines of a plan, proposed for the more effectual encouragement of vaccination in the United States.” (p. 9-12) is dated Jan. 15, 1816.
    The “Appendix” (p. [13]-15) contains the text of a memorial to Congress by “certain citizens of Virginia and Pennsylvania,” dated Jan. 15, 1813; a letter from Smith to Mr. Rhea, chairman of the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads; and “An act to encourage vaccination,” passed by the Congress and approved by President Madison Feb. 27, 1813.
  • Smith, James, Prospectus of a permanent national vaccine institution, to be established in the city of Washington, District of Columbia Baltimore: n. pl.. [2], 32 p. 13 cm.
    Address, proposals, appendix, etc. signed: James Smith, U.S. agent of vaccination. General Vaccine Institution, Baltimore.
  • Smith, James, Extract from the proceedings of the State of Pennsylvania, realtive to the kine-pock. Tuesday, January 30, 1810. Mr. Doty presented the memorial of Dr. James Smith, of the city of Baltimore, (enclosing an act of the legislature of Maryland;) which was read as follows, viz. To the Honourable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania: The memorial of James Smith, physician of the city of Baltimore [Baltimore]: n. pl.. 12 p. 16.3 cm.
  • Smith, James, The additional number to the Letters of Humanitas, together with John Hillen’s, William Jenkin’s & Doctor M’Kenzies letters — and other documents, relative to Polly Elliott’s case: to which is added, Mr. Jesse Hollingsworth’s letter — and a reply to the same — by James Smith, physician. Baltimore: n. pl.. 48, 24 p. 22 cm.
    “The editors of the Federal Gazette having omitted such parts of the following letters as were disagreeable to themselves — the present copy may be esteemed more accurate.” — note (p. [2]) signed: J.S.
    Smith had published in the Federal gazette and Baltimore daily advertiser, Nov. 12 – Secember 5, 1800, a series of “letters signed ‘Humanitas,’ containing strictures on the Board of Health, with suggestions for its improvement.” Cf. J.R. Quinan, Medical annals of Baltimore, Baltimore, 1884, p. 156.
    Polly Elliott was an orphan who had been refused admission to the Almshouse and soon after died of yellow fever.
    “Appendix” (communications concerning the yellow fever epidemic of 1800-1801): 24 p. at end.